Action Painting Company :: Antiquing ::

Fri 28 October 2016

Antiquing is a classical finish that adds a beautiful aged look to cabinetry, wood paneling, moldings, doors, or furniture. This finish is an excellent way to age and distress new millwork for a more rustic d├ęcor. With a little instruction you can create this subtle glow. Base ColorBenjamin Moore Paint #06Glaze Colors (A) Benjamin Moore Paint #AC-39How-To Instructions Prep 1: Before base coating, make sure your surface is in good condition. Patch holes and cracks with spackling paste, and wash any dirt from surface using a mild soap. Mask all windows, baseboards, and moldings using 2" painter's tape. Evenly apply paint with roller. Base coat should always be a satin or semi-gloss latex finish. Two coats may be necessary depending on coverage. Let

dry 24 hours. Prep 2: Before you faux, prepare your glaze/paint mixture(s). A 5:1 ratio (5 parts Faux Like A Pro glaze to 1 part paint) is highly recommended. This ratio will allow you time to work the finish and prevent it from drying too fast. Step 1: Using a latex brush, evenly apply glaze A in the direction of how wood grain would naturally flow. Work on one panel at a time, brushing the horizontal sections first. Keep in mind that wood grain runs lengthwise. Stop glazing at cross-sections. Step 2: Drag through the wet glaze with your bristle block brush in the direction of the wood grain. Make sure you hold the brush with steady pressure, dragging from left to right. Your goal is to create subtle, yet visible brush strokes. Wipe off the brush after each pass. Step 3: Wipe off excess glaze that spread onto the vertical sections of the panel with a damp sponge. Step 4: Evenly apply glaze A as in step 1, this time glazing the vertical sections. Step 5: Drag through the wet glaze with your bristle block brush in the direction of the wood grain. Make sure you hold the brush with steady pressure dragging from top to bottom. Your goal is to create subtle, yet visible brush strokes. Wipe off the brush after each pass. Step 6: Now it's time to glaze the raised flat panel. Using a latex brush, evenly apply glaze A in the direction of the wood grain. Step 7: In this step you can either vertically drag through the glaze as in step 5 or create visual interest by stippling the raised flat panel only. Using a stipple brush, pounce the entire raised panel until the glaze is evened out. Stipple over any ornamental details as well. Wipe the raised areas with a clean, damp rag. This will accentuate and define the ornaments. Seal with two coats of varnish for protection.

Tip 1 Avoid glaze build-up on your panel by applying less glaze. Remember, subtly is key with this finish. Less glaze will produce soft brush strokes. Tip 2 For best results drag your brush through the glaze in one or two passes. Avoid over stroking the glaze otherwise your finish will look muddy. Tip 3 If you are not pleased with the panel, you may remove the glaze with a wet rag and start over. The Faux Like A Pro glaze has up to a two-hour open time. Supplies: - gallon of glaze - gallon of varnish - bristle block brush - small stipple brush You will also need the following basic supplies from your local hardware store: - 4" latex all purpose brushes - paint roller - medium nap - roller tray - 3" latex cutting brush - large bucket for water etc.

Category: General